I have the feeling that this book was already a little rough, but after it fell out of its owner’s bike basket, he brought it to me for repair. The missing spine revealed that rather than sewn with thread, this book is held together with staples.

Over time, staples will rust and become brittle, can discolor the paper, and are prone to breaking. Depending on the book, it can be a good idea to remove them and resew the book with linen thread. Due to the time and cost involved, though, the owner decided to leave the staples in, which is fine.

At some point, the front flyleaf became rather firmly adhered to the pastedown, partially obscuring the bookseller’s stamp.

I love to see these old guys looking – not new – but solid and strong.

Five Easy Pieces

Well, not exactly easy.

This book had been torn apart as garbage, but the owner rescued it and wanted it to look just as it had. Some paper repair was required…

I wasn’t sure that I’d be able to get it back into the original cover, which was intact. Paper repairs and resewing add bulk that can make the repaired textblock thicker than it was originally. But it worked, and the book looks almost exactly as it did before the damage. You can see a tiny bit of linen reinforcement peeking through the original cloth. I could have tinted it to match the rest of the cloth, but as is, it blends and almost disappears into the scuffed areas, so I left it.

As for that torn page…

The Great Outdoors

This amazing book arrived in the mail, and was my first official Bay Area Book Repair job. It’s a family heirloom, given as a gift to the client’s grandfather, and stamped with his name on the cover. Structurally sound, it was badly scuffed, with bumped corners, and some unfortunate blue paint splatters.

Great Outdoors

I was able to pick off the biggest blobs of paint with minimal damage. I repaired the corners and re-tinted the scuffed areas of leather, restoring its uniformly mottled appearance.

Great Outdoors cover